Fruit of the Spirit

2010 Preaching Series: Also Available: PSD source files, 8 messages (outlines, study guides w/ blanks, & audio); amaray case cover (for cds/dvds)

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Temperance: a fruit of the Spirit

Have you noticed that our current generation (especially of Americans) has no concept of control. We are out-of-control. The drastic rise in credit card induced bankruptcies, divorce attorneys, and mini-riots are skyrocketing. Road rage, impulse spending, and all sorts of addictions are seen as ‘normal’ in our society… even in the church! We have totally lost the concept of temperance: the moderation of passions and appetites (Galatians 5:22-23).

Meekness: a fruit of the Spirit

Meekness is a rare concept in our culture – even among Christians. We can’t define it, we don’t know where to get it, and aren’t sure we’d really even want to keep it if we had it! It’s a word being used far more to describe our economy than our spirits. Tragically, meekness is becoming synonymous with weakness; when in actuality, meekness is odds with our weakness. Meekness will overturn your weakness if you will allow it!

Faith: a fruit of the Spirit

Some think that faith comes from within, inside of you, but in Ephesians 2:8, Paul reminds us that faith “is the gift of God” and that it comes from God. It is not something we can muster up or dig down deep to find. It is the fruit of God in the life of His surrendered child. In God, this is called foreknowledge. In us, it is the assurance of His foreknowledge. In Him, this is omniscience. For the Christian, it is reliance upon His omniscience.

Gentleness & Goodness: fruit of the Spirit

We live in a ‘dog-eat-dog’ world. There is not even much gentleness or goodness where you might expect to find it: nurses and doctors have become preoccupied with their paychecks, homes are toxic environments, and churches are full of bitterness. Yield to Christ, be gentle and good because that is what God is like and that is what gives Him much glory.

Longsuffering: a Fruit of the Spirit

‘Hurry up and wait.’ That ought to be my motto – but I can't bring myself to use it because it’s painfully all-too-true. Much of life is waiting and most of our frustrations come from unrealistic or improper expectations about life and others. We think longsuffering is a good quality for the driver behind us, but never for the one in front of us! We presume that others should give us a liberal amount of slack, yet we fail to deliver the same. This only leads to more frustration, impatience, and anger.